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Tree Texture

How to Plant a New Tree

Tree planting is my favorite part of tree care! It’s extremely important and is actually highly misunderstood by most professionals – from certified arborists, landscapers, contractors, city planners and even major educational installations. Proper tree planting and selection are the number one leading contributor to a healthy and long-lived tree! If it's not put in the ground right, then nothing works right and all systems are in failure mode. With the amount of misinformation and need for demonstration, I have included a video here of me planting a new tree. In this video, you will find all the major requirements for planting and even some secrets most people either don't know or have never performed. Most improperly installed trees will remain in the ground for upwards of 7 to 10 years before they die due to the installation. 

What kind of tree should I plant? is a question I’m asked quite frequently. “The right tree for the right place,” is a golden phrase in the arboricultural community. Before you know what type of tree you would like to select, you need to know what is suitable for the site. When possible, try to perform a drainage test to ensure that the tree won't become waterlogged. First, dig a hole about 2.5 to 3 feet deep. Fill the hole with water until it is filled, let drain, and immediately fill again with water. Let the water drain one last time completely and fill the hole for a third time. If the hole does not drain within one hour, you have poor drainage and should consider some type of ramification. 

Here is a short list of trees that I prefer to plant. Most trees on my list are unique so as not to add to the monocultures that landscapers are creating with only planting two or three species of tree.

Evergreen Trees

Alaskan Cedar

Juniper (any species)

Lebanon Cedar

Incense Cedar

Arizona Cypress

Leland Cypress

White Fir

Douglas Fir

Himalayan Pine 

Dawn Redwood

Giant Sequoia 

Bristlecone Pine

Larch

 

Deciduous Trees

Alder 

Golden Rain 

Tulip Tree

Ginkgo

Oak (white family) Pin, Scarlet, Swomp 

Dogwood

Japanese Pagoda

Chinese Elm 

Homestead Elm

Smoke Tree

**NO MAPLES**

Excluding Japanese

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